Planning and Delivery

Coaching Resources: Planning and Delivery Best Practices Limiters and Fixes Drills Analysis Workouts


Planning

  • There are many ways to successfully train a swimmer

  • Change and evolve: take this foundation plan and make it your own

  • Bring your own experience and beliefs, and use them

  • What works for one coach might not work for another

  • Research, study, learn, experiment (athletes love variety and so does the body)

  • Keys:

    • Fun (positive, social environment)

    • Effective (they must feel they are accomplishing something)

    • Welcoming (Coach must motivate and host the party)

  • Periodization

    • Simple: make sure they have the base of muscular fitness and proper movement patterns before excess load in terms of intensity and volume



Delivery

  • Swim Coaching: More technical = more development = more gratifying for coach and athlete

  • Collect Cues

    • There are many ways to communicate a correction, especially metaphorically – learn as many as you can since some will work on some swimmers and not on others

      • Visual Demo: Coach lifts elbow high as swimmer swims

      • Auditory: “Elbow to the sky”

      • Tactile: Fist drill – feel the water on forearm

      • Kinesthetic: Finger tip drag – forces pattern of movement

      • Metaphor: Reach over a barrel

  • Number One Tip: Catch them doing something right

    • Build their confidence and self-esteem

    • #1 goal: get them to relax in the water

    • Many athletes dislike swimming due to the level of difficulty involved in doing it well

    • Many swimmers feel awkward and self-conscious, partly due to lack of clothing

    • For every correction there should be 3 times you give them positive feedback

  • Correcting Swimmers

    • Never assume a level of understanding on the swimmer’s part – be simple and clear

    • First: Point out something they are doing well

    • Second: Communicate the correction

    • There can be more steps to this but time is short so that’s the minimum

    • If you have a well established relationship with the swimmer it can be correction only as long as it is done in a positive manner.

  • Managing the Practice

    • On deck 5 minutes early

    • Greet and chat

    • Tell swimmers what equipment they will require so they can get it before entering pool

    • Observe warm up – call them in at end

    • All talks, with exception of first couple weeks, should be < 3’

    • Welcome and intro practice: news, recognize an accomplishment, joke, overview of practice

    • Introduce set

      • Verbal and visual communication

      • Succinct but clear

      • Watch faces of audience for signs of understanding

      • Stand tall and pan your vision to all swimmers

      • Very rarely is a demo required by you – challenge yourself to explain it so well you don’t need one (If you know a swimmer knows the drill you can ask them to demo)

    • Observe set:

      • First thing to check is that everyone appears to understand the directions. (Their eyes may be on you while you speak but sometimes ears and brain are off)

      • Second observe and correct – goal is perfection of drill